Newsroom

Latest news releases and President's column.

CMU faculty will obey court order; classes resume tomorrow

Mt. Pleasant, Mich.; Aug. 22, 2011 -- The Central Michigan University Faculty Association will return to class tomorrow as ordered by Circuit Court Judge Paul H. Chamberlain in a temporary restraining order issued today.

CMU faculty declares job action

Mt. Pleasant, Mich.; Aug. 22, 2011 -- The CMU Faculty Association will not be in their classrooms on Monday, Aug. 22, the first day of classes. The faculty agreed to a job action beginning 7 a.m. Monday morning. 

During the faculty’s Sunday night membership meeting, CMU students were gathered outside to show their support for faculty.

Faculty wanted to bargain on Sunday, but the university refused, stating that if their proposals were not accepted, there was no reason to meet.

'A sad day for Michigan students'

Anti-collective bargaining, anti-tenure bills hurt children 

EAST LANSING, Mich., June 30, 2011 -- Michigan lawmakers who voted today to strip collective bargaining rights from public school employees and dismantle teacher tenure will be held accountable for actions that hurt

MEA President in the Detroit News: There's a right way to reform teacher tenure

I know the warning, "Don't throw the baby out with the bath water," is a cliché — but there is no better way to describe some legislators' utterly misguided attempts to reform teacher tenure. Read more.

MEA launches statewide radio ad in support of common-sense tenure reform

EAST LANSING, Mich., June 29, 2011 — The Michigan Education Association released a radio ad this week calling on the state Senate to pass Senate Bill 503, which would make much-needed reforms to teacher tenure while maintaining basic due process and collective bargaining rights for good teachers.

Senate Bill 503, introduced by state Sen. Roger Kahn (R-Saginaw), is a more common-sense and thoughtful approach to tenure reform than the radical legislation passed recently by the state House that would strip away basic rights from teachers. 

Michigan teachers announce support of common-sense tenure reform

EAST LANSING, Mich., Tuesday, June 28, 2011 — Public school teachers from across Michigan today announced their support of a state Senate proposal that would reform teacher tenure while protecting school employees’ basic due process and collective bargaining rights.

Senate Bill 503, introduced by state Sen. Roger Kahn (R-Saginaw), is a more common-sense and thoughtful approach to tenure reform than radical legislation passed recently by the state House.

MEA supports new Senate tenure reform bill

SB 503 addresses real issues with tenure while continuing to protect good teachers

LANSING, Mich., June 23, 2011 — The Michigan Education Association is in full support of a new Senate bill that addresses the real issues with tenure – the time and money involved in dismissing a teacher who is proven to be ineffective.

MEA launches statewide TV ads to hold politicians accountable for cutting schools

EAST LANSING, Mich., May 26, 2011— The Michigan Education Association released television ads this week calling on state politicians to “stop robbing our kids’ future” and to  reject cuts to the state’s K-12 budget.

MEA response to Senate votes on HB 4152 and SB 7

Salters: 'Yet another assault on public education and the middle class'

"Today's votes in the Michigan Senate on HB 4152 and SB 7 are yet another assault on public education and the middle class.

"On the heels of their votes to slash business taxes while cutting education and raising taxes on seniors and the working poor, Republican leaders continue to rob public employees.  School employees have been sharing in our state's sacrifice for the past decade, taking concessions through collective bargaining at the local level.  

MICHIGAN SENATE RAISES TAXES ON SENIORS, WORKING FAMILIES TO PAY FOR $1.8 BILLION CORPORATE TAX GIVEAWAY

Republican Senate leader says “no guarantee” legislation will create jobs

LANSING - Today the Michigan State Senate voted to raise taxes on seniors and working families to pay for a $1.8 billion tax break for corporate special interests like insurance companies, oil companies and Wall Street banks. More than a quarter of the Senate Republican caucus voted to reject the measure, forcing a 19-19 tie, which was broken by Lt. Gov. Brian Calley.

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