Posted on 09/29/14 at 3:44pm

OK2Say, the new student safety reporting system, was rolled out this month across the state. The new program will give students and adults a confidential way to report threats of violence in schools.  

Posted on 09/29/14 at 3:42pm

Interest in a reading comprehension system developed by a Flushing parent has drawn the interest of the University of Michigan and the Michigan Department of Education (MDE). The Evidence-Based Literacy Instruction (EBLI) was created more than 10 years ago by Nora Chahbazi to help her daughter struggling with reading comprehension in second grade.

Posted on 09/15/14 at 3:09pm

On Wednesday, Sept. 24, NEA President Lily Eskelsen Garcia is making Michigan a stop on her Back to School Tour! Location details are still being finalized, but put the date on your calendar.

Posted on 09/25/14 at 1:49pm

Thanks to NEA members in Flint, at MSU, and in Livonia, Plymouth, and Wayne-Westland, NEA President Lily Eskelsen-Garcia left Michigan on Sept. 24 with a pretty good idea of the successes, the challenges, and the future of education in the state. Lilly made Michigan one of her last stops on her three-week Back-to School Tour which has given her a chance to connect with members across the country.

Posted on 09/15/14 at 3:11pm

State Board of Education (SBE) members are looking for someone with experience in education-perhaps a former local superintendent or teacher-to be the next state superintendent of instruction. Their search is expected to be completed by January 2015, well ahead of current Superintendent Mike Flanagan's retirement in July 2015.

Posted on 09/22/14 at 3:13pm

Schools across the country, including Michigan, are falling victim to a scam by a Las Vegas company sending phony invoices to schools for workbooks they never ordered. The company is called Scholastic School Supply, similar to Scholastic, Inc., which is a well-known publisher for educational books, magazines and other materials. Michigan is one of 22 states that have received the phony invoices.

MEA responds to legislative attacks

Next big Lansing protest is Saturday

Several dozen MEA members, leaders, and staff were at the Capitol today to talk with legislators about votes this week affecting public employee wages and health care.

On Wednesday, the Senate passed House Bill 4152 (to freeze step wage increases when a contract expires) and Senate Bill 7 (to require public employees to pay at least 20 percent of the cost of their health insurance) and the House Education Committee approved bills to dismantle tenure and collective bargaining laws. Those votes compelled the educators to visit Lansing -- to hold accountable the lawmakers who supported these measures, and to thank those who did not.

MEA response to Senate votes on HB 4152 and SB 7

Salters: 'Yet another assault on public education and the middle class'

"Today's votes in the Michigan Senate on HB 4152 and SB 7 are yet another assault on public education and the middle class.

"On the heels of their votes to slash business taxes while cutting education and raising taxes on seniors and the working poor, Republican leaders continue to rob public employees.  School employees have been sharing in our state's sacrifice for the past decade, taking concessions through collective bargaining at the local level.  

Senate runs over school employees with HB 4152 and SB 7

Fight back! Lawmakers need to hear from you!

The Senate today approved historic changes to collective bargaining and public employee compensation, stripping locally elected officials of the right to make important decisions.

Despite intensive lobbying by MEA leaders, staff, and others, the GOP-led Senate passed bills that impede local control and impact all public employees in some way.

The Michigan Senate voted to eliminate step wage increases between contracts and to require employees to pay at least 20 percent of the cost of health care, issues currently negotiated locally between employers and employees. The bill affecting step increases now goes to the governor for his signature; the health cost bill now goes to the House, where it could be amended.

Urgent! Call your state senator NOW!

Urge them to vote NO on SB 7. Tell them to maintain local control of health premium sharing by employees. Call now at 517-373-2400.

Message - Governor Snyder's Education Plan

Gov. Rick Snyder can provide a wide spectrum of ideas for education but he can’t provide the desperately needed funding to ensure current programs and staff are maintained.

Sample school board resolution - Governor Snyder's Education Plan

We, the members of the ________________ School Board, believe in delivering a quality education for our children. We hire qualified staff and provide the necessary resources for them to do their job.

Talking points - Governor Snyder's Education Plan

  1. Broaden your circle of influence by having your superintendent and school board members draft a resolution condemning the attacks on public education.

Sample letter to the editor - Governor Snyder's education plan

Dear Editor,

Gov. Snyder’s education reform plan is just a distraction from his proposal to slash funding for public schools and use K-12 School Aid Fund money for colleges and universities. How does Gov. Snyder propose reforming education when he is robbing the schools of much-need funding and creating a budget crisis?

Talking points - Governor Snyder's Education Plan

  • Instead of slashing education and mortgaging our children’s future, the governor and the lawmakers should invest in our local schools and not give tax breaks to corporate special interests.  
  • Neither the governor’s plan nor his budget recognizes the sacrifices and reforms already made by school districts and school employees. His offering of $300 million to school districts who adopt his cost-cutting strategies does nothing to help districts already facing financial difficulties.
  • Backgrounder - Governor's Education Plan

    Gov. Snyder’s education address

    In his special education message. Gov. Rick Snyder covered a variety of topics in his plan to “reform” Michigan’s public education system through changes to tenure, teacher training, and financial incentives. He provided little or no details on how his plan would be carried out, but expects “reforms” to happen even as he’s cutting more than $800 million from K-12 and higher education funding and giving tax breaks to business.

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