Posted on 10/20/14 at 2:59pm

The Michigan Public Schools Partnership (MPSP) has launched InspirED, a newsletter featuring the innovative and inspiring stories happening every day for Michigan's 1.5 million public school students. 

Posted on 10/20/14 at 2:57pm

Michigan is one of 16 states that will probably be looking for flexibility from No Child Left Behind (NCLB) standards that call for using student test scores in teacher evaluations. The U.S. Department of Education (DOE) is offering to give states that already have an NCLB waiver even longer to create new assessments. Currently, the state still doesn't have an assessment that measures student growth.

Posted on 10/20/14 at 2:56pm

According to a report released last month by the National Center for Homeless Education (NCHE), nearly 1.26 million homeless students in primary and secondary grades across the country were enrolled in the 2012-13 school year. 

Posted on 10/14/14 at 9:53am

MEA members can now access MEA information and news via a new mobile app for iPhones and Android devices. You can link to the app or go into the iPhone "App Store" or Android's "Google Play" and search for "Michigan Education Association."

Posted on 10/14/14 at 9:04am

Amanda Erspamer-Berry, an MEA member and teacher in Marquette's Alternative High School, is one of 15 finalists for a $100,000 grant in Farmers Insurance "Dream Big Teacher Challenge." The grant is challenging educators from across the country to submit innovative proposals that would help students. Winners will be chosen based on the number of votes they receive. Your vote can help make Amanda's vision become a reality for her students.

Posted on 10/14/14 at 9:08am

NEA President Lily Eskelsen has finished her Back-to-School Tour and talks about "What I Saw, Who I Met and What You Should Know About My Back to School Tour" in her blog at LilysBlackboard.org.  She talks about her visit to Northwestern High School in Flint where students and staff worked hard to move the school off Michigan's Priority Schools list. Read what she learned from members across the country.

MEA responds to legislative attacks

Next big Lansing protest is Saturday

Several dozen MEA members, leaders, and staff were at the Capitol today to talk with legislators about votes this week affecting public employee wages and health care.

On Wednesday, the Senate passed House Bill 4152 (to freeze step wage increases when a contract expires) and Senate Bill 7 (to require public employees to pay at least 20 percent of the cost of their health insurance) and the House Education Committee approved bills to dismantle tenure and collective bargaining laws. Those votes compelled the educators to visit Lansing -- to hold accountable the lawmakers who supported these measures, and to thank those who did not.

MEA response to Senate votes on HB 4152 and SB 7

Salters: 'Yet another assault on public education and the middle class'

"Today's votes in the Michigan Senate on HB 4152 and SB 7 are yet another assault on public education and the middle class.

"On the heels of their votes to slash business taxes while cutting education and raising taxes on seniors and the working poor, Republican leaders continue to rob public employees.  School employees have been sharing in our state's sacrifice for the past decade, taking concessions through collective bargaining at the local level.  

Senate runs over school employees with HB 4152 and SB 7

Fight back! Lawmakers need to hear from you!

The Senate today approved historic changes to collective bargaining and public employee compensation, stripping locally elected officials of the right to make important decisions.

Despite intensive lobbying by MEA leaders, staff, and others, the GOP-led Senate passed bills that impede local control and impact all public employees in some way.

The Michigan Senate voted to eliminate step wage increases between contracts and to require employees to pay at least 20 percent of the cost of health care, issues currently negotiated locally between employers and employees. The bill affecting step increases now goes to the governor for his signature; the health cost bill now goes to the House, where it could be amended.

Urgent! Call your state senator NOW!

Urge them to vote NO on SB 7. Tell them to maintain local control of health premium sharing by employees. Call now at 517-373-2400.

Message - Governor Snyder's Education Plan

Gov. Rick Snyder can provide a wide spectrum of ideas for education but he can’t provide the desperately needed funding to ensure current programs and staff are maintained.

Sample school board resolution - Governor Snyder's Education Plan

We, the members of the ________________ School Board, believe in delivering a quality education for our children. We hire qualified staff and provide the necessary resources for them to do their job.

Talking points - Governor Snyder's Education Plan

  1. Broaden your circle of influence by having your superintendent and school board members draft a resolution condemning the attacks on public education.

Sample letter to the editor - Governor Snyder's education plan

Dear Editor,

Gov. Snyder’s education reform plan is just a distraction from his proposal to slash funding for public schools and use K-12 School Aid Fund money for colleges and universities. How does Gov. Snyder propose reforming education when he is robbing the schools of much-need funding and creating a budget crisis?

Talking points - Governor Snyder's Education Plan

  • Instead of slashing education and mortgaging our children’s future, the governor and the lawmakers should invest in our local schools and not give tax breaks to corporate special interests.  
  • Neither the governor’s plan nor his budget recognizes the sacrifices and reforms already made by school districts and school employees. His offering of $300 million to school districts who adopt his cost-cutting strategies does nothing to help districts already facing financial difficulties.
  • Backgrounder - Governor's Education Plan

    Gov. Snyder’s education address

    In his special education message. Gov. Rick Snyder covered a variety of topics in his plan to “reform” Michigan’s public education system through changes to tenure, teacher training, and financial incentives. He provided little or no details on how his plan would be carried out, but expects “reforms” to happen even as he’s cutting more than $800 million from K-12 and higher education funding and giving tax breaks to business.

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