Posted on 04/14/14 at 1:36pm

This year, MEA awarded a total of 45 scholarships to honor exemplary public school students from across the state who will be attending a Michigan public university next fall. The recipients were chosen from 905 applicants.

Posted on 04/14/14 at 1:37pm

If the Legislature provides the funding, the Michigan Department of Education (MDE) will implement a new plan to help school districts with budget deficits. The plan is part of Gov. Snyder’s budget recommendations. Currently, there are 46 school districts with budget deficits.

Posted on 04/14/14 at 1:39pm

The Michigan School Safety and Bullying Prevention Summit will be held at the Kellogg Center in East Lansing on Monday, April 28 from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Posted on 04/14/14 at 1:40pm

If you’re looking to get involved in a community event that promotes safety and a healthy habit, consider signing up for the National Bike to School Day on Wednesday, May 7. In Michigan, the event is sponsored by the Michigan Fitness Foundation to make communities more walkable and “bikeable.”

Posted on 04/07/14 at 11:21am

MEA’s Professional Development/Human Rights Department is hosting a series of WebEx trainings on professional practice portfolios, an alternative approach to teacher evaluations.  The first training, “Introduction to the UTF Professional Practice Portfolio (P3)” is now available for viewing. *

Posted on 04/07/14 at 11:27am

Michigan students aren’t keeping pace with other states when it comes to showing improvement in areas of reading and math, according to a report by Education Trust-Midwest, a Royal Oak-based education advocacy and research organization. The group used 10 years’ worth of data on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) given to fourth, eighth and 12th graders.

President Steve Cook in the Detroit News: Will Michigan schools run out of money?

March Madness.

For some, it means college basketball’s biggest tournament. For many Michigan drivers, March Madness has meant dodging crater-sized potholes as our roads continue to deteriorate. But for Michigan school districts, March Madness has taken on a new meaning: the growing fear that money will run out before the year ends.

Last year saw the tip of the iceberg with Saginaw Buena Vista closing its doors three weeks early. This year, many other districts are teetering on the brink of financial collapse. Just like Michigan’s roads, Michigan’s school districts have been denied adequate funding to sustain themselves.

To see just how badly each district in the state has been hurt by Gov. Rick Snyder and legislative leaders, the Michigan Education Association recently unveiled a new website, kidsnotceos.com. . . 

Click here to read the entire article.

Whittemore-Prescott Teachers Agree to Wage Cuts

Houghton Lake, Mich., March 7, 2014--Teachers in the Whittemore-Prescott school district recently agreed to significant wage reductions to keep schools open and prevent the district from going into deficit.

Putting the focus on education

In a Lansing State Journal opinion editorial, MEA members Lisa Crites from Okemos and Gini Larson from Waverly write, “As public educators, we believe that all children should have the opportunity to get a good, quality education in our public schools. And all students should have the opportunity to get a well-rounded education that includes extracurricular activities like arts, drama, athletics and clubs.”

Gini Larson and Lisa Crites: See what's happened to your schools' funding

As policymakers debate Michigan’s budget, politicians are rightfully focusing their attention on education. Frontline teachers like us welcome the focus — and urge legislators to fully fund our classrooms and restore resources to our kids after three years of going backwards on education.

Read the entire Lansing State Journal opinion editorial from two of our members

 

Michigan gets $16.7 million to help low achieving schools

Michigan will be receiving $16,757,681 to help the lowest performing schools in the state. The money is part of a “School Improvement Grants” program established by the U.S. Department of Education.

State Board wants schools to reduce number of suspensions, expulsions

The State Board of Education (SBE) wants schools districts to review their zero tolerance policies on suspensions and expulsions in an effort to reduce the number of times they are used to discipline students for minor problems.

Michigan will field test MEAP replacement

Today opens the window period for the field testing of the Smarter Balanced Assessment tests which will replace the Michigan Educational Assessment Program (MEAP) next year. More than 120,000 students in 675 schools across the state are scheduled to participate in two field test windows.

Livonia BFCL training presents one-of-a-kind PD opportunity

The Building Full Capacity Locals (BFCL) program is offering an intensive professional development agenda for members on April 1 at the VisTa Tech Center at Schoolcraft College, from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. There is no charge for training or meals.

Help for Common Core available through MEA Cadre

The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) has an impact on virtually every facet of education, but there are still members needing assistance putting them into practice in their classrooms. Now, there’s professional development help available with the MEA Leading with Common Core Leadership and Advocacy Cadre (CCLAC). 

Through the efforts of MEA’s Professional Development/Human Rights Department, 26 MEA members were invited to join CCLAC to assist teachers across the state in dealing with the instructional and policy implications of CCSS. The Cadre is made up of teachers from across the state and will be providing professional development through online and face-to-face trainings.

Melanie Waltz, Field Services Consultant and organizer of the program, said, “The Cadre will have the opportunity to work with teachers across the state to advocate and support CCSS in a way that will have a positive impact on teachers and students.”

Groups blame policymakers for skyrocketing cost of higher education

According to the Consumer Price Index, college costs across the country have doubled. Michigan is not exception and the reason can be traced back to budget decisions being made by our legislators. In Michigan, the cost of a college education is more and more being shifted to students since legislative support for higher education has been dwindling.

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