Issues and legislation

Information on the current legislation and legislative news.

Bill Tracker

Retirement Issues and Legislation

Education Reform 

Legislative Updates (PDF)


 

State Board of Ed. adopts accreditation standards

The new system addresses concerns that Education YES – the current accreditation system – doesn’t adequately measure districts and there are no sanctions for schools not accredited. 

MEA testifies on tenure bills

Michigan senate

Art Przybylowicz, MEA General Counsel, and Mary Aldecoa, Fowlerville teacher and EA president, testified before the Senate Education Committee on the four-bill tenure proposal passed by the House last week.

He pointed out that we can have tenure reform that is fair, less time consuming and expensive and still provide due process for the dismissal of ineffective teachers.

Przybylowicz spoke in opposition to House Bills 4625-4628 which amend tenure and dismantle collective bargaining calling them “poorly conceived, apparently hastily drafted, and based upon a faulty premise—the infallibility of building principals.”


How did your Representative vote on tenure legislation?

Find out how your state Representative voted on House Bills 4625, 4626, 4627 and 4628.

Jeb Bush offers a ‘road map of reform for Michigan’

Today, in a joint meeting of the Senate and House Education committees, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush claimed great success for his education reform plan in Florida—taking it from 50 out of 50 states in terms of student achievement to a 21 percent improvement in student test scores.

Changes to state employees’ retirement -- could we be next?

The House Appropriations Committee heard testimony today on HB 4701 and 4702 which would gut the state employees retirement health system and shift the $14.5 unfunded liability of the plan onto the backs of employees.

June 15, 2011 - Senate testimony before the Education Committee on Tenure Reform

MEA General Counsel Art Przybylowicz testifies before the Senate Education Committee on the four-bill tenure package.

Mary Aldecoa, Fowlerville teacher and EA president, provides the teacher perspective on tenure to the Senate Education Committee.

 

MEA fighting anti-collective bargaining bills in Senate

Michigan Senate
Michigan Senate

The Michigan Senate is the next stop for a four-bill package designed to unravel collective bargaining and tenure laws, legislation that would impact all public school employees.

Last week, the GOP-led state House passed House Bills 4625, 4626, 4627, and 4628 with bipartisan opposition after heavy lobbying from MEA members and staff. MEA will have an increased presence at the Capitol beginning Tuesday, with members and staff stepping up efforts to work with moderate senators willing to consider alternative ideas, including MEA-backed reforms to streamline the process of disciplining or discharging ineffective teachers with tenure.

Health care bills up in House committee

The House Oversight, Reform, and Ethics Committee will continue its work this week on legislation dealing with public employee health care. The panel meets Tuesday to consider House Bills 4087 and 4572 and Senate Joint Resolution C.

Q&A: How will these bills impact me?

Answers to common questions about House Bills 4625-4628, including: What is the current status of these bills? Could "good teachers" lose their jobs if these bills become law? Could I be fired for reasons that have nothing to do with job performance?

How did your representative vote on HB 4625, 4626,4627 and 4628?

House Bill No. 4625, entitled

A wolf in sheep’s clothing

Anti-tenure bills would kill collective bargaining, too

A four-bill package pending in the state House to overhaul tenure would actually reach far beyond what some say is the real problem – the time and money it takes to discharge a teacher with tenure.

The legislation – House Bills 4625, 4626, 4627, and 4628 – would, in fact, dismantle tenure AND collective bargaining of most subjects currently decided at the local bargaining table, including placement of employees, evaluation systems, discharge/discipline policies, and more. In an ironic turn, the legislation is backed by Republicans, who usually claim to oppose such intrusions on local control by state government.

Under this legislation, it would be possible for a school district to fire an unmarried, pregnant teacher. Or a tenured teacher who happens to be gay. Or an unpopular employee disliked by the principal. Or veteran teachers who can be replaced with cheaper, less experienced alternatives.

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