Posted on 06/29/15 at 12:26pm

This Wednesday, Brian Whiston takes over as the new State Superintendent. In an interview with the Detroit Free Press, he talks about standardized testing, school funding, charter and cyber schools, deficit schools and teacher evaluations.

Posted on 06/29/15 at 12:27pm

Michigan delegates to NEA's Representative Assembly will join more than 7,000 educators on their way to Orlando to help set education policy and talk about what's best for students. The annual meeting starts July 3 and runs through July 6.

Posted on 06/22/15 at 5:38pm

SaveOnEnergy.com is looking for the best lesson plans for teaching students about energy. By submitting your plan, you have a chance to win a $500 Teacher Grant for your classroom. Save On Energy.com will be awarding six $500 grants in the form of Visa Reward Cards to be used toward classroom materials and activities. SaveOnEnergy.com is a resource for consumers on all aspects of energy and sustainability.

Posted on 06/22/15 at 5:25pm

Lt. Gov. Brian Calley is holding meetings around the state with parents of special education students to gather input on their experiences with the state’s special education system. To reach even more parents, Calley also launched an online survey which will be available through August. 

Posted on 06/22/15 at 5:31pm

The U.S. Supreme Court has unanimously ruled that teachers and educators should not be put in law enforcement roles when they carry out their duty of reporting suspected child abuse or neglect. The National Education Association (NEA) filed an amicus brief in the case, Ohio v. Clark, stating that “educators’ valuable role as mandatory reporters and caregivers should not be compromised.”

Posted on 06/30/15 at 9:19am

With the passage of Michigan’s Public Employment Relations Act in 1965, teachers finally went from begging to bargaining. Thanks to PERA, all public school employees have the right to negotiate for fair wages, quality health care benefits and decent working conditions.

Personalized Learning webinars features MEA member

The Michigan Department of Education (MDE) is hosting the last in a series of webinars featuring models of Personalized Learning on May 21 from 4 to 5 p.m. Nicholas Provenzono, a Grosse Pointe Public Schools teacher and MEA member, will be presenting “Creating a Genius in Every Hour.”

There’s still room for you in the LPA!

If you’re a local president looking for guidance and support, there’s still time to get the training you and your local need through the 2015-16 Local Presidents Academy (LPA). The deadline has been extended to June 15 and all local presidents—new, experienced, EA, ESP, higher ed, with or without release time—can benefit from the program at little or no cost to participants or to the local.

Laughter and play aren’t luxuries—they’re necessities!

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Participants in the annual BFCL Ladies Day at the MEA on May 8 got inspiration and ideas for their professional and personal lives from an unusual keynote speaker—a stand-up comedian. Sharon Lacey is a former award-winning teacher who quit the profession when she feared she was showing early signs of Alzheimer’s which runs in her family.

“I was scared. I decided it was better to do everything in life I wanted to do while I still could. I always wanted to be a stand-up comedian. It’s been quite an adventure and I’ve learned to embrace it,” Lacey said. 

That was more than nine years ago, but she still draws on her experiences as a middle school history teacher to connect with her audience through humor. 

“Considering what you’re dealing with—mandatory testing with test results tied to your evaluations, union busting, wage cuts—a mountain of problems—it feels  like you’re working in a war zone. And I should know, I’ve been in Iraq entertaining our troops,” Lacey told the ladies.

She touched on topics familiar to her audience—homework, Facebook, classroom supplies, and school pictures—bringing humor to every-day situations that, at some point, have tested the patience of every educator in the room. 

MEA Voice Magazine

April 2015 - In this Issue 

  • Proposal 1
  • Vaccinations
  • M-STEP
  • MEA/MAEA Art Exhibition

 

 

 

Snyder proposes two separate school districts for Detroit

Gov. Snyder’s K-12 education plan to restructure Detroit splits the district into two separate ones—one to pay off the $483 million debt, and one to oversee enrollment and other district functions.

Great Lakes review shows urban charter schools don’t perform significantly better than traditional public schools

Charter schools in urban areas don’t generate better outcomes than traditional public schools, according to Andrew Maul, assistant professor at the University of California Santa Barbara. Maul reviewed the Urban Charter School Study done by the Center for Research on Education Outcomes (CREDO) at Stanford University which states “charter schools in urban environments provide a slightly greater test score advantage than those in non-urban environments."

Celebrate yourself this week! You deserve it!

NEA and the National PTA have set aside this week, May 4-8, as Teacher Appreciation Week, to recognize and celebrate the important roles and contributions of educators. NEA, along with Kansas and Indiana state affiliates, and the Dodge City, Kansas local chapter lobbied Congress for a day to recognize educators. The first Teacher Day was celebrated on March 7, 1980. 

President Cook sends members’ comments on M-STEP testing to State Board of Education

In a memo to the State Board of Education, MEA President Steve Cook again addresses the continued issues members are having trying to implement the Michigan Student Test of Educational Progress (M-STEP). Accompanying the memo is a sample of some of the hundreds of comments MEA members provided about their experience with the testing. The memo is a follow-up to Cook’s open letter last week to Gov. Snyder.

Cook: Pass Prop 1, fix Michigan’s roads

“Michigan’s road quality is among the worst in the nation,” according to a study done by the East Lansing-based Anderson Economic Group.

Urban charter schools don’t perform significantly better than traditional public schools

Charter schools in urban areas don’t generate better outcomes than traditional public schools according to Andrew Maul, assistant professor at the University of California Santa Barbara. Maul reviewed the Urban Charter School Study  done by the Center for Research on Education Outcomes (CREDO) at Stanford University which states “charter schools in urban environments provide a slightly greater test score advantage than those in non-urban environments.

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